The tragedy of a starved imagination

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Desiring God

“The irony of our time is that, though we have more powerful image-making technologies than ever, we continue to be caught in what the poet Paul Claudel called ‘the tragedy of a starved imagination.’”

“Llosa observes that, in the past, the purpose of culture was edification: building society by civilizing one person at a time, teaching them character and values of good citizenship. In contrast, a culture of spectacle serves mainly to cure boredom: to distract and entertain. The problem with cultures of spectacle is that they fall prey to the law of diminishing returns. One has to find an ever-faster, steeper rollercoaster to keep the thrill alive. The dinosaurs have to be bigger; the destruction has to be on a grander scale. Eventually the spectacular special effects dull our senses to the marvels of the everyday. In addition, all these special effects make the ministry of the word — speaking into air — appear weak and uninteresting.” – Dr. Vanhoozer

My reading today was this article from Desiring God: A refreshing interview where Kevin Vanhoozer explains how our hyper social media culture and all that entertainment diminishes our ability to enjoy God, others and beauty. It was so convicting that I had to send it to my younger cousins…

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